Forex Trading Strategies Module Three: Moving Averages ...

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II
Firstly, thanks for the overwhelming comments and feedback. Genuinely really appreciated. I am pleased 500+ of you find it useful.
If you didn't read the first post you can do so here: risk management part I. You'll need to do so in order to make sense of the topic.
As ever please comment/reply below with questions or feedback and I'll do my best to get back to you.
Part II
  • Letting stops breathe
  • When to change a stop
  • Entering and exiting winning positions
  • Risk:reward ratios
  • Risk-adjusted returns

Letting stops breathe

We talked earlier about giving a position enough room to breathe so it is not stopped out in day-to-day noise.
Let’s consider the chart below and imagine you had a trailing stop. It would be super painful to miss out on the wider move just because you left a stop that was too tight.

Imagine being long and stopped out on a meaningless retracement ... ouch!
One simple technique is simply to look at your chosen chart - let’s say daily bars. And then look at previous trends and use the measuring tool. Those generally look something like this and then you just click and drag to measure.
For example if we wanted to bet on a downtrend on the chart above we might look at the biggest retracement on the previous uptrend. That max drawdown was about 100 pips or just under 1%. So you’d want your stop to be able to withstand at least that.
If market conditions have changed - for example if CVIX has risen - and daily ranges are now higher you should incorporate that. If you know a big event is coming up you might think about that, too. The human brain is a remarkable tool and the power of the eye-ball method is not to be dismissed. This is how most discretionary traders do it.
There are also more analytical approaches.
Some look at the Average True Range (ATR). This attempts to capture the volatility of a pair, typically averaged over a number of sessions. It looks at three separate measures and takes the largest reading. Think of this as a moving average of how much a pair moves.
For example, below shows the daily move in EURUSD was around 60 pips before spiking to 140 pips in March. Conditions were clearly far more volatile in March. Accordingly, you would need to leave your stop further away in March and take a correspondingly smaller position size.

ATR is available on pretty much all charting systems
Professional traders tend to use standard deviation as a measure of volatility instead of ATR. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Averages are useful but can be misleading when regimes switch (see above chart).
Once you have chosen a measure of volatility, stop distance can then be back-tested and optimised. For example does 2x ATR work best or 5x ATR for a given style and time horizon?
Discretionary traders may still eye-ball the ATR or standard deviation to get a feeling for how it has changed over time and what ‘normal’ feels like for a chosen study period - daily, weekly, monthly etc.

Reasons to change a stop

As a general rule you should be disciplined and not change your stops. Remember - losers average losers. This is really hard at first and we’re going to look at that in more detail later.
There are some good reasons to modify stops but they are rare.
One reason is if another risk management process demands you stop trading and close positions. We’ll look at this later. In that case just close out your positions at market and take the loss/gains as they are.
Another is event risk. If you have some big upcoming data like Non Farm Payrolls that you know can move the market +/- 150 pips and you have no edge going into the release then many traders will take off or scale down their positions. They’ll go back into the positions when the data is out and the market has quietened down after fifteen minutes or so. This is a matter of some debate - many traders consider it a coin toss and argue you win some and lose some and it all averages out.
Trailing stops can also be used to ‘lock in’ profits. We looked at those before. As the trade moves in your favour (say up if you are long) the stop loss ratchets with it. This means you may well end up ‘stopping out’ at a profit - as per the below example.

The mighty trailing stop loss order
It is perfectly reasonable to have your stop loss move in the direction of PNL. This is not exposing you to more risk than you originally were comfortable with. It is taking less and less risk as the trade moves in your favour. Trend-followers in particular love trailing stops.
One final question traders ask is what they should do if they get stopped out but still like the trade. Should they try the same trade again a day later for the same reasons? Nope. Look for a different trade rather than getting emotionally wed to the original idea.
Let’s say a particular stock looked cheap based on valuation metrics yesterday, you bought, it went down and you got stopped out. Well, it is going to look even better on those same metrics today. Maybe the market just doesn’t respect value at the moment and is driven by momentum. Wait it out.
Otherwise, why even have a stop in the first place?

Entering and exiting winning positions

Take profits are the opposite of stop losses. They are also resting orders, left with the broker, to automatically close your position if it reaches a certain price.
Imagine I’m long EURUSD at 1.1250. If it hits a previous high of 1.1400 (150 pips higher) I will leave a sell order to take profit and close the position.
The rookie mistake on take profits is to take profit too early. One should start from the assumption that you will win on no more than half of your trades. Therefore you will need to ensure that you win more on the ones that work than you lose on those that don’t.

Sad to say but incredibly common: retail traders often take profits way too early
This is going to be the exact opposite of what your emotions want you to do. We are going to look at that in the Psychology of Trading chapter.
Remember: let winners run. Just like stops you need to know in advance the level where you will close out at a profit. Then let the trade happen. Don’t override yourself and let emotions force you to take a small profit. A classic mistake to avoid.
The trader puts on a trade and it almost stops out before rebounding. As soon as it is slightly in the money they spook and cut out, instead of letting it run to their original take profit. Do not do this.

Entering positions with limit orders

That covers exiting a position but how about getting into one?
Take profits can also be left speculatively to enter a position. Sometimes referred to as “bids” (buy orders) or “offers” (sell orders). Imagine the price is 1.1250 and the recent low is 1.1205.
You might wish to leave a bid around 1.2010 to enter a long position, if the market reaches that price. This way you don’t need to sit at the computer and wait.
Again, typically traders will use tech analysis to identify attractive levels. Again - other traders will cluster with your orders. Just like the stop loss we need to bake that in.
So this time if we know everyone is going to buy around the recent low of 1.1205 we might leave the take profit bit a little bit above there at 1.1210 to ensure it gets done. Sure it costs 5 more pips but how mad would you be if the low was 1.1207 and then it rallied a hundred points and you didn’t have the trade on?!
There are two more methods that traders often use for entering a position.
Scaling in is one such technique. Let’s imagine that you think we are in a long-term bulltrend for AUDUSD but experiencing a brief retracement. You want to take a total position of 500,000 AUD and don’t have a strong view on the current price action.
You might therefore leave a series of five bids of 100,000. As the price moves lower each one gets hit. The nice thing about scaling in is it reduces pressure on you to pick the perfect level. Of course the risk is that not all your orders get hit before the price moves higher and you have to trade at-market.
Pyramiding is the second technique. Pyramiding is for take profits what a trailing stop loss is to regular stops. It is especially common for momentum traders.

Pyramiding into a position means buying more as it goes in your favour
Again let’s imagine we’re bullish AUDUSD and want to take a position of 500,000 AUD.
Here we add 100,000 when our first signal is reached. Then we add subsequent clips of 100,000 when the trade moves in our favour. We are waiting for confirmation that the move is correct.
Obviously this is quite nice as we humans love trading when it goes in our direction. However, the drawback is obvious: we haven’t had the full amount of risk on from the start of the trend.
You can see the attractions and drawbacks of both approaches. It is best to experiment and choose techniques that work for your own personal psychology as these will be the easiest for you to stick with and build a disciplined process around.

Risk:reward and win ratios

Be extremely skeptical of people who claim to win on 80% of trades. Most traders will win on roughly 50% of trades and lose on 50% of trades. This is why risk management is so important!
Once you start keeping a trading journal you’ll be able to see how the win/loss ratio looks for you. Until then, assume you’re typical and that every other trade will lose money.
If that is the case then you need to be sure you make more on the wins than you lose on the losses. You can see the effect of this below.

A combination of win % and risk:reward ratio determine if you are profitable
A typical rule of thumb is that a ratio of 1:3 works well for most traders.
That is, if you are prepared to risk 100 pips on your stop you should be setting a take profit at a level that would return you 300 pips.
One needn’t be religious about these numbers - 11 pips and 28 pips would be perfectly fine - but they are a guideline.
Again - you should still use technical analysis to find meaningful chart levels for both the stop and take profit. Don’t just blindly take your stop distance and do 3x the pips on the other side as your take profit. Use the ratio to set approximate targets and then look for a relevant resistance or support level in that kind of region.

Risk-adjusted returns

Not all returns are equal. Suppose you are examining the track record of two traders. Now, both have produced a return of 14% over the year. Not bad!
The first trader, however, made hundreds of small bets throughout the year and his cumulative PNL looked like the left image below.
The second trader made just one bet — he sold CADJPY at the start of the year — and his PNL looked like the right image below with lots of large drawdowns and volatility.
Would you rather have the first trading record or the second?
If you were investing money and betting on who would do well next year which would you choose? Of course all sensible people would choose the first trader. Yet if you look only at returns one cannot distinguish between the two. Both are up 14% at that point in time. This is where the Sharpe ratio helps .
A high Sharpe ratio indicates that a portfolio has better risk-adjusted performance. One cannot sensibly compare returns without considering the risk taken to earn that return.
If I can earn 80% of the return of another investor at only 50% of the risk then a rational investor should simply leverage me at 2x and enjoy 160% of the return at the same level of risk.
This is very important in the context of Execution Advisor algorithms (EAs) that are popular in the retail community. You must evaluate historic performance by its risk-adjusted return — not just the nominal return. Incidentally look at the Sharpe ratio of ones that have been live for a year or more ...
Otherwise an EA developer could produce two EAs: the first simply buys at 1000:1 leverage on January 1st ; and the second sells in the same manner. At the end of the year, one of them will be discarded and the other will look incredible. Its risk-adjusted return, however, would be abysmal and the odds of repeated success are similarly poor.

Sharpe ratio

The Sharpe ratio works like this:
  • It takes the average returns of your strategy;
  • It deducts from these the risk-free rate of return i.e. the rate anyone could have got by investing in US government bonds with very little risk;
  • It then divides this total return by its own volatility - the more smooth the return the higher and better the Sharpe, the more volatile the lower and worse the Sharpe.
For example, say the return last year was 15% with a volatility of 10% and US bonds are trading at 2%. That gives (15-2)/10 or a Sharpe ratio of 1.3. As a rule of thumb a Sharpe ratio of above 0.5 would be considered decent for a discretionary retail trader. Above 1 is excellent.
You don’t really need to know how to calculate Sharpe ratios. Good trading software will do this for you. It will either be available in the system by default or you can add a plug-in.

VAR

VAR is another useful measure to help with drawdowns. It stands for Value at Risk. Normally people will use 99% VAR (conservative) or 95% VAR (aggressive). Let’s say you’re long EURUSD and using 95% VAR. The system will look at the historic movement of EURUSD. It might spit out a number of -1.2%.

A 5% VAR of -1.2% tells you you should expect to lose 1.2% on 5% of days, whilst 95% of days should be better than that
This means it is expected that on 5 days out of 100 (hence the 95%) the portfolio will lose 1.2% or more. This can help you manage your capital by taking appropriately sized positions. Typically you would look at VAR across your portfolio of trades rather than trade by trade.
Sharpe ratios and VAR don’t give you the whole picture, though. Legendary fund manager, Howard Marks of Oaktree, notes that, while tools like VAR and Sharpe ratios are helpful and absolutely necessary, the best investors will also overlay their own judgment.
Investors can calculate risk metrics like VaR and Sharpe ratios (we use them at Oaktree; they’re the best tools we have), but they shouldn’t put too much faith in them. The bottom line for me is that risk management should be the responsibility of every participant in the investment process, applying experience, judgment and knowledge of the underlying investments.Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital
What he’s saying is don’t misplace your common sense. Do use these tools as they are helpful. However, you cannot fully rely on them. Both assume a normal distribution of returns. Whereas in real life you get “black swans” - events that should supposedly happen only once every thousand years but which actually seem to happen fairly often.
These outlier events are often referred to as “tail risk”. Don’t make the mistake of saying “well, the model said…” - overlay what the model is telling you with your own common sense and good judgment.

Coming up in part III

Available here
Squeezes and other risks
Market positioning
Bet correlation
Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
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Former investment bank FX trader: news trading and second order thinking

Former investment bank FX trader: news trading and second order thinking
Thanks to everyone who responded to the previous pieces on risk management. We ended up with nearly 2,000 upvotes and I'm delighted so many of you found it useful.
This time we're going to focus on a new area: reacting to and trading around news and fundamental developments.
A lot of people get this totally wrong and the main reason is that they trade the news at face value, without considering what the market had already priced in. If you've ever seen what you consider to be "good" or "better than forecast" news come out and yet been confused as the pair did nothing or moved in the opposite direction to expected, read on...
We are going to do this in two parts.
Part I
  • Introduction
  • Why use an economic calendar
  • How to read the calendar
  • Knowing what's priced in
  • Surveys
  • Rates decisions
  • First order thinking vs second order thinking

Introduction

Knowing how to use and benefit from the economic calendar is key for all traders - not just news traders.
In this chapter we are going to take a practical look at how to use the economic calendar. We are also going to look at how to interpret news using second order thinking.
The key concept is learning what has already been ‘priced in’ by the market so we can estimate how the market price might react to the new information.

Why use an economic calendar

The economic calendar contains all the scheduled economic releases for that day and week. Even if you purely trade based on technical analysis, you still must know what is in store.

https://preview.redd.it/20xdiq6gq4k51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=6cd47186db1039be7df4d7ad6782de36da48f1db
Why? Three main reasons.
Firstly, releases can help provide direction. They create trends. For example if GBPUSD has been fluctuating aimlessly within a range and suddenly the Bank of England starts raising rates you better believe the British Pound will start to move. Big news events often start long-term trends which you can trade around.
Secondly, a lot of the volatility occurs around these events. This is because these events give the market new information. Prior to a big scheduled release like the US Non Farm Payrolls you might find no one wants to take a big position. After it is released the market may move violently and potentially not just in a single direction - often prices may overshoot and come back down. Even without a trend this volatility provides lots of trading opportunities for the day trader.

https://preview.redd.it/u17iwbhiq4k51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=98ea8ed154c9468cb62037668c38e7387f2435af
Finally, these releases can change trends. Going into a huge release because of a technical indicator makes little sense. Everything could reverse and stop you out in a moment. You need to be aware of which events are likely to influence the positions you have on so you can decide whether to keep the positions or flatten exposure before the binary event for which you have no edge.
Most traders will therefore ‘scan’ the calendar for the week ahead, noting what the big events are and when they will occur. Then you can focus on each day at a time.

Reading the economic calendar


Most calendars show events cut by trading day. Helpfully they adjust the time of each release to your own timezone. For example we can see that the Bank of Japan Interest Rate decision is happening at 4am local time for this particular London-based trader.

https://preview.redd.it/lmx0q9qoq4k51.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c6e9e1533b1ba236e51296de8db3be55dfa78ba1

Note that some events do not happen at a specific time. Think of a Central Banker’s speech for example - this can go on for an hour. It is not like an economic statistic that gets released at a precise time. Clicking the finger emoji will open up additional information on each event.

Event importance

How do you define importance? Well, some events are always unimportant. With the greatest of respect to Italian farmers, nobody cares about mundane releases like Italian farm productivity figures.
Other events always seem to be important. That means, markets consistently react to them and prices move. Interest rate decisions are an example of consistently high importance events.
So the Medium and High can be thought of as guides to how much each event typically affects markets. They are not perfect guides, however, as different events are more or less important depending on the circumstances.
For example, imagine the UK economy was undergoing a consumer-led recovery. The Central Bank has said it would raise interest rates (making GBPUSD move higher) if they feel the consumer is confident.
Consumer confidence data would suddenly become an extremely important event. At other times, when the Central Bank has not said it is focused on the consumer, this release might be near irrelevant.

Knowing what's priced in

Next to each piece of economic data you can normally see three figures. Actual, Forecast, and Previous.
  • Actual refers to the number as it is released.
  • Forecast refers to the consensus estimate from analysts.
  • Previous is what it was last time.
We are going to look at this in a bit more detail later but what you care about is when numbers are better or worse than expected. Whether a number is ‘good’ or ‘bad’ really does not matter much. Yes, really.

Once you understand that markets move based on the news vs expectations, you will be less confused by price action around events

This is a common misunderstanding. Say everyone is expecting ‘great’ economic data and it comes out as ‘good’. Does the price go up?
You might think it should. After all, the economic data was good. However, everyone expected it to be great and it was just … good. The great release was ‘priced in’ by the market already. Most likely the price will be disappointed and go down.
By priced in we simply mean that the market expected it and already bought or sold. The information was already in the price before the announcement.
Incidentally the official forecasts can be pretty stale and might not accurately capture what active traders in the market expect. See the following example.

An example of pricing in

For example, let’s say the market is focused on the number of Tesla deliveries. Analysts think it’ll be 100,000 this quarter. But Elon Musk tweets something that hints he’s really, really, really looking forward to the analyst call. Tesla’s price ticks higher after the tweet as traders put on positions, reflecting the sentiment that Tesla is likely to massively beat the 100,000. (This example is not a real one - it just serves to illustrate the concept.)

Tesla deliveries are up hugely vs last quarter ... but they are disappointing vs market expectations ... what do you think will happen to the stock?

On the day it turns out Tesla hit 101,000. A better than the officially forecasted result - sure - but only marginally. Way below what readers of Musk's twitter account might have thought. Disappointed traders may sell their longs and close out the positions. The stock might go down on ‘good’ results because the market had priced in something even better. (This example is not a real one - it just serves to illustrate the concept.)

Surveys

It can be a little hard to know what the market really expects. Often the published forecasts are stale and do not reflect what actual traders and investors are looking for.
One of the most effective ways is a simple survey of investors. Something like a Twitter poll like this one from CNBC is freely available and not a bad barometer.
CNBC, Bloomberg and other business TV stations often have polls on their Twitter accounts that let you know what others are expecting

Interest rates decisions

We know that interest rates heavily affect currency prices.
For major interest rate decisions there’s a great tool on the CME’s website that you can use.

See the link for a demo

This gives you a % probability of each interest rate level, implied by traded prices in the bond futures market. For example, in the case above the market thinks there’s a 20% chance the Fed will cut rates to 75-100bp.
Obviously this is far more accurate than analyst estimates because it uses actual bond prices where market participants are directly taking risk and placing bets. It basically looks at what interest rate traders are willing to lend at just before/after the date of the central bank meeting to imply the odds that the market ascribes to a change on that date.
Always try to estimate what the market has priced in. That way you have some context for whether the release really was better or worse than expected.

Second order thinking

You have to know what the market expects to try and guess how it’ll react. This is referred to by Howard Marks of Oaktree as second-level thinking. His explanation is so clear I am going to quote extensively.
It really is hard to improve on this clarity of thought:
First-level thinking is simplistic and superficial, and just about everyone can do it (a bad sign for anything involving an attempt at superiority). All the first-level thinker needs is an opinion about the future, as in “The outlook for the company is favorable, meaning the stock will go up.” Second-level thinking is deep, complex and convoluted.
Howard Marks
He explains first-level thinking:
The first-level thinker simply looks for the highest quality company, the best product, the fastest earnings growth or the lowest p/e ratio. He’s ignorant of the very existence of a second level at which to think, and of the need to pursue it.
Howard Marks
The above describes the guy who sees a 101,000 result and buys Tesla stock because - hey, this beat expectations. Marks goes on to describe second-level thinking:
The second-level thinker goes through a much more complex process when thinking about buying an asset. Is it good? Do others think it’s as good as I think it is? Is it really as good as I think it is? Is it as good as others think it is? Is it as good as others think others think it is? How will it change? How do others think it will change? How is it priced given: its current condition; how do I think its conditions will change; how others think it will change; and how others think others think it will change? And that’s just the beginning. No, this isn’t easy.
Howard Marks
In this version of events you are always thinking about the market’s response to Tesla results.
What do you think they’ll announce? What has the market priced in? Is Musk reliable? Are the people who bought because of his tweet likely to hold on if he disappoints or exit immediately? If it goes up at which price will they take profit? How big a number is now considered ‘wow’ by the market?
As Marks says: not easy. However, you need to start getting into the habit of thinking like this if you want to beat the market. You can make gameplans in advance for various scenarios.
Here are some examples from Marks to illustrate the difference between first order and second order thinking.

Some further examples
Trying to react fast to headlines is impossible in today’s market of ultra fast computers. You will never win on speed. Therefore you have to out-think the average participant.

Coming up in part II

Now that we have a basic understanding of concepts such as expectations and what the market has priced in, we can look at some interesting trading techniques and tools.
Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The trimming position effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases
Hope you enjoyed this note. As always, please reply with any questions/feedback - it is fun to hear from you.
***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
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EURUSD Trading

Hello, so I did a bit of a research and I'm really curious how do I become better in trading? I'm ambitious young guy who suffers with Obsesive-Compulsive disorder and forex trading is driving me insane.. I want to know it all man and I don't care how much time will it take! I'm following RSI and moving averages indicators on tradingview.com and buying/selling depends if it's way above average or way below average. I mostly do scalping techniques - I was trading on demo account for like a year and right now I'm trading with my real money (invested 100 EUR and now I'm 120 EUR after 4 months of trading).. I still feel like a newbie with this dumb technique which is probably most of the people doing, so my question is: how do I become better and understand the market from technical side/statistics side etc? Are there any useful videos/books (rather books) which are really useful for understanding? I don't mind learning the hardest things which take time.. but right now I really don't feel I'm progressing any further. Thank you for any links, comments etc.
submitted by CompulsiveGamblerSK to Forex [link] [comments]

The 3 Keys to Successful Forex Trading

The 3 Keys to Successful Forex Trading
The main key component is one we have referenced as of now, it is additionally the one component of trading that appears to get the most consideration - The Trading Strategy.
  1. The Trading Strategy
Your Trading Strategy is essentially how you trade, what must occur with the end goal for you to pull the trade trigger? Most trading methodologies depend on pointers, for example, RSI, Moving Average or a mix of a couple of various markers, by and by I lean toward not to trade dependent on markers. Having the option to just peruse the Price Action off the outlines will furnish you with an a lot more grounded base in deciding your trades.
Whatever your decision, having a decent trading system is significant when attempting to turn into a beneficial Forex trader. The inquiry is I don't get my meaning by 'great'? What establishes a 'decent' trading technique? Most traders characterize a 'decent' trading system as one that has a high pace of progress. Truly you have to ask, how has this 'achievement rate' been built up? Over what number of trades would it say it was resolved, 10 trades? 100 trades? What's more, shouldn't something be said about posing the inquiry were all trades made after the exact strides of the trading system?
It isn't as basic as finding a trading methodology that professes to have a 70% achievement rate and after that simply running with it, odds are on the off chance that you've been in the trading game for quite a while you will realize that it is never that clear.
For example
A Trading Strategy professes to have a triumph pace of 70%
Anyway when you trade it, your prosperity rate is just 40%
For what reason is this?
Obviously it may be the case that maybe Trading Strategy A does not have a 70% achievement rate in any case, however suppose for this model is does. Anyway, what else could be the issue? The appropriate response is you are deficient with regards to the next two key components of a fruitful Forex Trader, how about we investigate the subsequent one.
  1. Trading Psychology
There is one key part that influences each and every trade you take... you. Your Trading Psychology regularly is the contrast between a fruitful trade and an ineffective one.You can be the most grounded disapproved of person on the planet, however you are as yet human and as a human you have feelings.
Trading is an in all respects exceptionally charged passionate game, particularly when you are trading a lot of cash, normally your feelings can surpass and impact your intuition/conduct as a trader. Now and again you will intuitively take a trade dependent on your feelings, regardless of whether you are 'Vengeance Trading' or simply being plain eager, it is all down to how solid your Trading Psychology.
You could have the best Trading Strategy in the World, yet on the off chance that you have a powerless Trading Psychology, at that point it means nothing. How about we investigate a portion of the manners by which your feelings may influence your trading choices.
Feelings that keep you away from taking the trade
Feelings that lure you to take a trade
Feelings that cloud your judgment
Your Trading Psychology will improve as your presentation to the business sectors improve, obviously I am alluding to LIVE Trading with genuine cash. Trading a DEMO record is fine to begin with, yet you would prefer not to get too open to trading DEMO reserves, when you can begin trading LIVE. It would be ideal if you obviously guarantee you comprehend the dangers included, and NEVER trade with cash that you can not stand to hazard.
The last key is a distinct advantage, most beginners don't comprehend the influence that it yields, the following key is Money Management.
  1. Cash Management
We are on the whole extraordinary, a few of us have £5,000 put aside that we can place into trading, some have just £500 and for some those sorts of figures they can just dream of. As such we are for the most part extraordinary, we as a whole have various accounts, various points/objectives, various purposes behind trading the Forex Market.
Cash Management or Risk Management, is that significant piece of trading that decides how a lot of cash you will chance on a solitary trade. This sum will be dictated by what your individual objective/s are and furthermore how a lot of cash you need to really put resources into the market.
When in doubt of thumb, when you are prepared to begin trading genuinely it is ideal to hold your hazard down to 1%, and base your Money Management around that. Tragically, there are a lot of 'Forex Gurus' out there on the Internet who don't make reference to the significance of Managing your hazard (steer far away from these sorts of individuals), or express that it's alright to chance more; state 3% or even 5% (inconceivable!)
The truth of the matter is it doesn't make a difference how extraordinary a Trader you believe you are, it is basically scientifically demonstrated that during your trading exercises you will have misfortunes and one to a great extent, yet keeps running of misfortunes. The inquiry you truly need to pose to yourself is, will I get by during this episode of misfortunes? Or on the other hand will it clear my record out?
Suppose for example you endure a shot of 9 losing trades continuously, you hazard 5% of your record balance on each trade:
Opening Account Balance: £5,000
5% Risk per Trade: £250 Risk Per Trade
9 Losses x 5% = 45% LOSS
Remaining Account Balance: £2,750
You will lose simply under portion of your whole Account Balance! The time taken and the trouble in attempting to make that shortage up will be incredibly troublesome, and figuring in the way that you will in any case have losing trades, makes the entire thing much increasingly chaotic.
How about we currently investigate what occurs on the off chance that we hazard just 1%:
Opening Account Balance: £5,000
1% Risk per Trade: £50 Risk Per Trade
9 Losses x 1% = 9% LOSS
Remaining Account Balance: £4,550
Here we lose just shy of 10% of our Trading Account Balance, an entirely sensible sum for a 9 trade losing streak. Be SMART, Trading is about capital conservation first, and taking a gander at making a benefit just once you have mulled over your Money Management.
Along these lines, there you have it. A snappy take a gander at the 3 Keys to Successful Forex Trading. Learn them, it would be ideal if you share them by means of Social Media with other people who are likewise keen on the field, spread the adoration!
Upbeat Trading. https://www.livingfromtrading.com/
https://preview.redd.it/4a35e8gunyj31.jpg?width=1440&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a9d35ca5d47dc51faaa27153549723de8597f3b0
submitted by snowcartel0 to marketingservice [link] [comments]

How to Create a Forex Trading Strategy Alfa Financials

How to Create a Forex Trading Strategy Alfa Financials
How to Create a Forex Trading Strategy?

The word ‘Strategy’ itself is intimidating to novice traders as there are no foolproof techniques to create a flawless strategy. You might have a tight grip over the concepts of trading, but that doesn’t come in handy when creating a strategy. So, here are the basics to help you create a strategy.
Step 1: Identify the trader in you The first factor to consider before developing a trading strategy is the time frame in which you can trade. In Forex trading, you can trade at your convenience, but sticking to a routine will help you make an effective strategy. Day traders are those who can spend most of their time reading charts and numbers. They make over a dozen trades in a day. Swing traders hold on to a stock for a few days, and the time they spend is only to keep themselves up to date.
Step 2: Foresee the trend The better you know the trend, the better are your chances of profit. The trend is the way in which the market moves. Remember, you can make profits from both uptrend and downtrend. The moving average is one of the simple ways to identify the trend. There are a number of chart analysis indicators which can help you confirm the trend.
Step 3: Workout the risk A good trader is always calculative of his risks. Know how much you can spare for the trade and never dump everything you have in a single trade. Always be aware of what can happen when things don’t go your way. Your strategy should reflect on how much you can afford to lose in a trade and should get you out keeping your losses low.
Step 4: Determine your entry/exit points Your strategy should define when to enter a trade and when to exit. Some traders get out even with a marginal profit, while some tend to hold on to it longer. The charts can go either way, so know your entries & exits, and stick to your plan no matter what. Without calculating your entry & exit, it is easy to succumb to the disposition effect.
Step 5: Write it down and stick to it Once your well thought out strategy is ready, write it down and stick to it, at least for a considerable amount of time. Discipline plays an important role to not connect to your investments emotionally. A number of traders have lost a fortune stepping out of their strategy after giving in to emotions. There is no strategy to win your profits in every single trade, so feel the need to change & update your strategy according to the trend.
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submitted by alfafinancials5 to u/alfafinancials5 [link] [comments]

After 9 months of obsession, here is my open source Node.js framework for backtesting forex trading strategies

TL;DR There's lots more to the story. But the code is all open source now. Have at it. I'm too exhausted to continue with this. If you'd like more details, feel free to message me. If you happen to carry on with this project or use any ideas from it, I would greatly appreciate it if you could keep in touch on your findings. If anyone has any insights, please feel free to comment or message me.
I've spent the last nine months working furiously on this. I started a project for backtesting strategies against data I exported from MetaTrader. I had a very powerful computer crunching numbers constantly, trying to find the most optimal configuration of strategy indicator inputs that would results in the highest win rate and profit possible.
Eventually, after talking with a data scientist, I realized my backtesting optimizer was suffering from something called overfitting. He then recommend using the k-fold cross-validation technique. So, I modified things (in the "k-fold" forex-backtesting branch), and in fact it provided very optimistic results when backtested against MetaTrader data (60 - 70% win rate for 3 years). However, I had collected 3 months of data from a trading site (by intercepting their Web Socket data), and when I performed validation tests against that data using the k-fold results created from the MetaTrader data, I only got a ~57% win rate or so. In order to break even with Binary Options trading, you need at least a 58% win rate. So in short, the k-fold optimization results produce a good result when validation tested against data exported from MetaTrader, but they do not produce a good result when validation tested against the trading site's data.
I have two theories on why this ended up not working with the trading site's data:
For the strategy I use the following indicators: SMA (Simple Moving Average), EMA (Exponential Moving Average), RSI (Relative Strength Index), Stochastic Oscillator, and Polynomial Regression Channel. forex-backtesting has an optimizer which tries hundreds of thousands of combinations of values for each of these indicators, combined, and saves the results to a MongoDB database. It can take days to run depending on how many configurations there are.
Basically the strategy tries to detect price reversals and trade with those. So if it "thinks" the price is going to go down within the next five minutes, it places a 5 minutes PUT trade. The Polynomial Regression Channel indicator is the most important indicator; if the price deviates outside the upper or lower value for this indicator (and other indicators meet their criteria for the strategy), then a trade is initiated. The optimizer tries to find the best values for the upper and lower values (standard deviations from the middle regression line).
Additionally, I think it might be best to enter trades at the 59th or 00th second of each minute. So I have used minute tick data for backtesting.
Also, I apologize that some of the code is messy. I tried to keep it clean but ended up hacking some of it in desperation toward the end :)
gulpfile.js is a good place to start as far as figuring out how to use the tools available. Look through the available tasks, and see how various "classes" are used ("classes" in quotes because ES5 doesn't have real class support).
The best branches to look at are "k-fold" and "master", and "validation".
One word of advice: never, ever create an account with Tradorax. They will call you every other day, provide very bad customer support, hang up the phone on you, and they will make it almost impossible to withdraw your money.
submitted by chaddjohnson to algotrading [link] [comments]

Auto-trading fun with Bollinger bands [Novice level].

Whilst we have a fair few 'novice' posts about TA and Global Macro (aka "Fundamentals"), there aren't too many involving auto-trading. Seeing as I'm in the middle of teaching myself MQL4, I thought I'd throw this out there as discussion prompter.
By "novice", I mean someone who has moved beyond complete beginner ("what's a FOMC and a NFP?") but still not deploying robust and market ready strategies ("how does market structure affect news event response?"), so constructive criticism, informed commentary or taking the ideas and developing them further are very much the point of sharing in the first place. It's not meant to be a showcase of code, because the code is a mess!
This post got me thinking about how relatively trivial it would be to implement a Bollinger Band mean reversion autotrader.
Project Goals
My interest in the project was as a way to begin development of a skeleton EA that would use a custom indicator to implement trade signals. The point of this would be to allow for faster prototyping of visually based autotrading before taking it to the testing environment. The key advantage of this is that you can see on your charts which entries are being missed, something that is much more laborious to do via visual mode in the strategy tester.
Concept Development
So to begin the project, I sketched out the concept.
One way to trade Bollinger Bands is to trade the reversion to the mean. Intuitively, we expect that wider deviations from the mean will result in more reliable reversions to the mean. To explore this we could enter when price breaches the second SD band and then returns back inside it.
Here's the default Bollinger Band on default settings in MT4, demonstrating this sort of behaviour:
http://i.imgur.com/dK2oDO7.png
Prototyping
I want to use the indicator, and not the EA, to generate trade signals, as this is the point of the project for me. Because I'm lazy and grew up coding in basements, I opt to fiddle with the default indicator code rather than build up from scratch.
My first goal is to add two things.
Firstly, I want to add another layer of bands, because I saw a set up like that a while ago and liked it. (This is not a very good reason, and I think it costs me down the track).
Secondly, I want to add in a way to visually indicate the trade signals before we pass them to the EA.
Adding another set of bands is just a copy and paste of the existing bands. My learning point here is that I need to adjust the amount of buffers to match the number of bands I want. This comes into play for adding the trade signal arrows, as they need to go in the same sort of structure as the second lot of bands.
[I know from reading about the project goals in advance that EAs access custom indicators via iCustom(). This function can only receive the contents of one of the first 8 indicator buffers. Thus the idea will be that the buffer that marks out the trade entries on the indicator will later be used by the EA to mark out where entries should be. It's possible this is not the best way for EAs to access custom indicators , so input from more experienced coders is welcome!]
#property indicator_chart_window #property indicator_buffers 8 // <---- have to set this to match your copy and pasted buffer amount #property indicator_color1 LightSeaGreen #property indicator_color2 LightSeaGreen #property indicator_color3 LightSeaGreen // hack in (make 'em colourful. Turns out I didn't understand how the numbering worked, and indictator_color4 is never visualised) #property indicator_color4 clrWhite #property indicator_color5 clrWhite #property indicator_color6 clrRed #property indicator_color7 clrGreen #property indicator_color8 clrRed //--- indicator parameters input int InpBandsPeriod=50; // Bands Period input int InpBandsShift=0; // Bands Shift input double InpBandsInnerDeviations=1.0; // Add in for our other Band input double InpBandsOuterDeviations=2.0; // Bands Deviations //--- buffers double ExtMovingBuffer[]; double ExtUpperBuffer[]; double ExtLowerBuffer[]; double ExtStdDevBuffer[]; // hack in buffers (these buffers will store our trade signals) double SellSignalBuffer[]; double BuySignalBuffer[]; // these buffers will hold the additional bands. apologies for the naming, I didn't originally intend to share this double ExtUpperUpperBuffer[]; double ExtLowerLowerBuffer[]; //+------------------------------------------------------------------+ //| Custom indicator initialization function | //+------------------------------------------------------------------+ int OnInit(void) { //--- 1 additional buffer used for counting. IndicatorBuffers(8); // don't forget to adjust this to account for the new buffers IndicatorDigits(Digits); //--- middle line SetIndexStyle(0,DRAW_LINE); SetIndexBuffer(0,ExtMovingBuffer); SetIndexShift(0,InpBandsShift); SetIndexLabel(0,"Bands SMA"); //--- upper band SetIndexStyle(1,DRAW_LINE); SetIndexBuffer(1,ExtUpperBuffer); SetIndexShift(1,InpBandsShift); SetIndexLabel(1,"Bands Upper"); //--- lower band SetIndexStyle(2,DRAW_LINE); SetIndexBuffer(2,ExtLowerBuffer); SetIndexShift(2,InpBandsShift); SetIndexLabel(2,"Bands Lower"); SetIndexBuffer(3,ExtStdDevBuffer); //--- Copy and paste from above, and just change the number! Upper outer band is INDEX 4 SetIndexStyle(4,DRAW_LINE); SetIndexBuffer(4,ExtUpperUpperBuffer); SetIndexShift(4,InpBandsShift); SetIndexLabel(4,"Bands Outer Upper"); //--- Copy& paste, lower outer band is INDEX 5 SetIndexStyle(5,DRAW_LINE); SetIndexBuffer(5,ExtLowerLowerBuffer); SetIndexShift(5,InpBandsShift); SetIndexLabel(5,"Bands Outer Lower"); //--- remind myself which is which so I don't forget later: sell signal is INDEX 6!!!! SetIndexStyle(6,DRAW_ARROW); SetIndexArrow(6,218); SetIndexBuffer(6,SellSignalBuffer); SetIndexShift(6,InpBandsShift); SetIndexLabel(6,"Sell Signal"); //--- buy signal is INDEX 7 !!! SetIndexStyle(7,DRAW_ARROW); SetIndexArrow(7,217); SetIndexBuffer(7,BuySignalBuffer); SetIndexShift(7,InpBandsShift); SetIndexLabel(7,"Buy Signal"); //--- check for input parameter if(InpBandsPeriod<=0) { Print("Wrong input parameter Bands Period=",InpBandsPeriod); return(INIT_FAILED); } //--- SetIndexDrawBegin(0,InpBandsPeriod+InpBandsShift); SetIndexDrawBegin(1,InpBandsPeriod+InpBandsShift); SetIndexDrawBegin(2,InpBandsPeriod+InpBandsShift); // hack in our additional buffers, so they also start at the corect point SetIndexDrawBegin(4,InpBandsPeriod+InpBandsShift); SetIndexDrawBegin(5,InpBandsPeriod+InpBandsShift); SetIndexDrawBegin(6,InpBandsPeriod+InpBandsShift); SetIndexDrawBegin(7,InpBandsPeriod+InpBandsShift); //--- initialization done return(INIT_SUCCEEDED); } //+------------------------------------------------------------------+ //| Bollinger Bands | //+------------------------------------------------------------------+ // all of this code is from the default indicator int OnCalculate(const int rates_total, const int prev_calculated, const datetime &time[], const double &open[], const double &high[], const double &low[], const double &close[], const long &tick_volume[], const long &volume[], const int &spread[]) { int i,pos; //--- if(rates_total<=InpBandsPeriod || InpBandsPeriod<=0) { return(0); } //--- counting from 0 to rates_total ArraySetAsSeries(ExtMovingBuffer,false); ArraySetAsSeries(ExtUpperBuffer,false); ArraySetAsSeries(ExtLowerBuffer,false); ArraySetAsSeries(ExtStdDevBuffer,false); // hack in to make sure our custom buffers run in the same direction ArraySetAsSeries(SellSignalBuffer,false); ArraySetAsSeries(ExtUpperUpperBuffer,false); ArraySetAsSeries(ExtLowerLowerBuffer,false); ArraySetAsSeries(BuySignalBuffer,false); ArraySetAsSeries(close,false); ArraySetAsSeries(high,false); ArraySetAsSeries(low,false); //--- initial zero if(prev_calculated<1) { for(i=0; i1) pos=prev_calculated-1; else pos=0; //--- main cycle for(i=pos; i After a bit of tweaking typos, the indicator now displays two sets of bands, one at 1x SD and one at 2xSD from the mean (moving average). It also has two buffers that will use the DRAW_ARROW style to mark out potential trades.
Adding trade logic
I still can't decide if it's better to isolate the logic code in the Custom Indicator or the EA, in the long run. There seem to be performative, stylistic and redundancy issues, but for the moment the project is to put the logic in the Indicator, so that's what I did.
The fastest way to prototype this idea seems to be identifying when price closes outside of the far band.
This is trivial to achieve. We compare the close to the two outer bands, and if it's outside them, then we set the relevant trade signal buffer.
//
 double tempclose = close[i]; if(tempclose>(ExtUpperUpperBuffer[i]+10*Point)) { SellSignalBuffer[i] = high[i]+(20* Point); } else { SellSignalBuffer[i] = 0; } if(tempclose<(ExtLowerLowerBuffer[i]-10*Point)) { BuySignalBuffer[i] = low[i]-(20*Point); } else { BuySignalBuffer[i]=0; } } 
It works!
http://i.imgur.com/Ak3UkkK.png
Green arrows successfully mark out possible sell entries where price closes above the top band, and red arrows mark out possible buy entries when price closes below the lower band.
The logic can be a lot more complicated than this obviously, but the point of my project is to develop the iCustom technique, rather than make a good autotrader.
Now it's time to switch to the EA.
part two to follow
submitted by alotmorealots to Forex [link] [comments]

VOLUM

VOLUM is a technology-based blockchain-period holding association. Holding associations have been aside of the endeavor and making a theory scene for abundance various years. A bit of the most outrageous acclaimed clusters inside the world, which joins Alphabet (Google), Berkshire Hathaway, General Electric and Bank of America are worked as protecting workplaces. VOLUM use the blessings of a guaranteeing office shape which, by technique for design, limits chances through development, and gifts shared establishment to snappy addition economies of scale. In the VOLUM event, all portfolio bundles influence an average neighborhood forex and blockchain technology organize that enables streamlined pass on chain control, B2B business focus trades maintained by techniques for trustless wise contracts and impelled records examination. Portfolio associations benefit by vertical what's increasingly, even compromise potential results with other VOLUM working organizations. VOLUM takes minority proprietorship positions in a wide extent of associations, insightful assets and distinctive assets. These advantages are tokenized on the VOLUM decentralized stage and made available to monetary experts on virtual money exchanges. As a taking care of association, VOLUM will create through getting of minority esteem stakes in promising business focus disruptors, when all is said in done blockchain-chiefly based, specifically exorbitant impact markets. VOLUM is searching for affiliations that have strong control get-togethers, stable market systems and feasible organizations or things. While the association needs to consume money on blockchain-on a very basic level based business try styles, salary balance and academic homes, these properties are not ordinarily necessities. The organizations pick by VOLUM are common quality, pass on chain the board programming as an organization (explicitly for the wines and spirits industry territory), and cell/social promoting applications. VOLUM has moved a decentralized stage dependent on the Ethereum blockchain. Through the execution of smart contracts related with each ERC-20 and ERC-721 steady VOLUM token (VLM), the stage can address an expansive kind of trade sorts. VLM can in this way be used as an utility token to perform trades more than a few business attempt components with a different extent of things and organizations. Any portfolio substance of the securing supervisor that has a blockchain-based business undertaking should get the VLM token as its sole programming token. A portfolio business adventure with an operational blockchain-based completely arrange the use of a present application token may be required to replace the then present day application token with the VLM token. Moreover, blockchain-based exercises inside the system of being made by portfolio associations must use the VLM programming token.
Site: https://volum.io
White Paper: https://volum.io/resources/pictures/volum-whitepaper.pdf
Bounty0x Username: Sandycee
submitted by Sandycee003 to ICOAnalysis [link] [comments]

Forex Day Trading Strategies for 2017

Forex Day Trading Strategies for 2017
Forex day trading is quickly becoming one of the most popular ways for the average person to make money. In Forex, day trading refers to entering and exiting a trade within the same trading day. Sometimes this can last a few seconds, and sometimes it can last a few hours. You do not need to be a financial whiz in order to become a Forex trader. You simply need to master some trading techniques involved in the business in order to become profitable.
How do you know what Forex day trading strategy to follow? What is the best day trading strategy? There are many out there and everyone has their own ideas about how to trade. However, as a beginner, you should start 2017 with the following FX day trading strategies and tips, and then build from there.
Follow the Daily Trading Trend
This is one of the simplest and most effective beginner Forex day trading strategies. Carefully look at the charts and the trading market each day in order to see where the daily trend is moving on the four-hour trading chart. If you need to, watch some live trades as well to get a feel for what is happening. Once you think you know where the trends are headed, begin your trading in the same direction. The four-hour trading chart allows you to trade without being in front of your computer all day and you can earn more money through less work. Use a demo account to practice on.
Start Trading Small
You do not have to trade large amounts of money at first, especially if you decide to try trading with the trend. Always start off small to see how the day is going to move and whether or not the trend is going to be profitable. If the four-hour trading chart is profitable you can add to each trade when the time is right.
Trade with a Stop Loss Order in Place
All Forex orders — especially stop-loss orders — are an important beginner Forex day trading strategy. A stop-loss order will help you keep from losing all of the money you make on a trade. It is a form of money management. When you have a stop-loss in place you will automatically stop trading on a lot when the first – and smallest – loss is registered. This helps you manage the gains and losses you make when Forex trading and it is an important part of the trade. You should never trade without the stop loss order.
Use Market Indicators and Trust Them as You Trade
Every trader has a set of indicators they use when Forex day trading. Once you learn which ones benefit you in your trading, use them and trust them. Each indicator has signals that will guide you in determining where to set your stop loss and where to make trades. Pay attention to what your indicators are telling you and you will see that trading with your indicators in place will be extremely profitable.
Have Realistic Expectations as a Beginner
We realize that not everyone reading this is a complete beginner. Some of you might even be profitable traders looking to expand your range of strategies. Unfortunately, the vast majority of traders looking for new information are system hoppers with very little experience and knowledge. And for this reason, this advice is almost entirely aimed at struggling beginners.
Don’t expect to be able to instinctively predict market movements with little to no understanding of markets and price action. You might get lucky on a demo account but it won’t be the same experience when you trade with real money, especially when it comes to day trading – the most psychologically tolling trading method for newbies.
Different Strategies For Different Types of Trades
The majority of beginners and less-experienced traders (not yet consistently profitable on the monthly or quarterly basis) are far better suited for longer term trading strategies. Among other things, longer-term strategies allow a trader far more free time and require less screen time.
Day trading is a specialized occupation that takes years of work and experience to master. If it’s the road you choose, be prepared for the bumpy road ahead, but rest assured, it’s not impossible… and it’s not the only way to trade profitably either.
Thank You
submitted by MyDogWorld to DailyForexTrading [link] [comments]

The Complete Ichimoku Course - From Beginner To Advanced

The Complete Ichimoku Course - From Beginner To Advanced Hello Guys, In this video I want to introduce you to the main system / Indicator that I use for trading which gives me the most consistent profits and reliability. The Indicator or system that I use is called ‘Ichimoku’. Full title is 'Ichimoku Kinko Hyo'. And was invented by a Japanese trader called Goichi Hosoda (細田悟一 Hosoda Goichi), a Japanese trader / journalist who used to be known as Ichimoku Sanjin, which can be translated as "what a man in the mountain sees". Ichimoku translates into He spent 30 years perfecting the technique before releasing his findings to the general public in the late 1960s. Ichimoku Kinko Hyo in Japanese translates to 'one glance equilibrium chart' or 'instant look at the balance chart' and is sometimes referred to as "one glance cloud chart" based on the unique "clouds" that feature in ichimoku charting, reffered to as the Kumo Clouds. Hosada's Ichimoku system incorporates some very useful and effective trading signals, which consist of the following. We have the chikou crossing through price, that's the first signal, we have a tenkensen bounce and break, we have a kijunsen bounce and break, there’s the kumo cloud bounce and breakout, and the tenkensen and kijunsen cross, which is normally abbreviated to the TK cross. This complete charting and trend indicator forms a very powerful, and useful aid in our trading, and, to be used to it’s full potential, all these elements need to be used, and studied in conjunction with each other. As you can see if you’ve never come across this system before it can be very intimidating and complex, however fear not - If you are interested in learning about this complete system or are simply just struggling with your own trading - if you visit my website you can sign up for my complete ichimoku trading strategies course and become a member. In this course I cover the ichimoku system from beginner to advanced, in fine detail and talk about how I trade, and how I have been profitable consistently for the last 20 years, using ichimoku as my main Indicator. I also talk about money management, price action, when to trade and when not to trade, and my preferred forex pairs for trading. I also cover support and resistance, divergence, moving averages along with profit targets, stops and even the psychology of trading. So if you would like to learn about this ichimoku system, visit my website which is tradingtoprofit.com and sign up for the course which is over 6.5 hours long and split into various sections for you to learn at your own pace and accessible anytime at a later date to refresh your knowledge. I’ll put a link under the description of this video to my website. Also if you would like to keep watching my videos please subscribe, comment or like. Thank you for watching this video and I hope to see you in the course soon. Take care and good luck in your trading.
https://youtu.be/sttcW5PB9rQ
submitted by Dr_Trader to StockMarket [link] [comments]

How to use a Forex Robot

How to use a Forex Robot
https://preview.redd.it/p9ga08w641121.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=2e6efec7a84f437fab19c8d2e65a737bfbc3d38f
What Is an Algorithm or Forex Robot?
In its simplest form, an algorithm is a list of steps needed to solve a problem. When referring to algorithmic trading, we refer to steps written in machine language so that a computer can understand what you want and execute trades on behalf of you and your goals. An algorithm spans multiple functions outside of trading but either way the algorithmis used; it has a clear purpose to help compute large datasets in an efficient manner while abiding by key rules to help ensure the desired outcome. Algorithms accomplish this feat without having to worry about human biases or mental fatigue and high-level and high-frequency decision-making.
-Algorithm Trading Styles
The following list is not inclusive but does cover many commonly used strategies and styles in algorithmic trading:
Mean Reversion: Reverting to the mean takes the idea that an extended move away from a long-term average is likely short-term and due for a reversion or retracement. Algorithms that quantify extended moves based on an oscillator will utilize the average price over a set time and use that level as a target. There many popular tools and calculations for quantifying an extension that is due to revert but risk management must also be included in the algorithm encasing new trend is developing.
Trend following: Trend following is the first, and still very popular technique of algorithmic-based momentum investing. Trends are easy to see, but can be hard to trade without the help of an algorithm. Because algorithms take over for the mind and the minds inherent biases, many of the fears that plague discretionary trend followers do not effect algorithms. A common fear when riding a strong trend is that it is about to turn or end, but that fear is often unfounded. One of the first widely followed trend following algorithms looked to buy a 20-day price breakout and hold that trade until a 20-day price low took them out of the trade. The traders who have and still do employ this algorithmic approach and other similar approaches are often amazed at how long the strongest trends extend that they would have likely exited had their algorithms not managed the trade and exit on their behalf.
News Trading: Another popular style of trading in the archaic world of discretionary trading that now belongs to the Quants is news trading. These strategies scan high important news events and calculate what type of print relative to prior news events and expectations would be needed to place a trade. As you can imagine, the efficiency of receiving the data and calculating whether a trade should be placed in entering that trade is of key focus. This form of algorithmic trading often gets the lion share of media’s attention.
Arbitrage:Arbitrage is a word that has multiple meetings and strategies built around the concept. Historically, you could have euros trading in London at a different price than in New York so that a trader could buy the lower and sell the higher until equilibrium had been established. Nowadays, arbitrage algorithm strategies are more geared to highly correlated assets whose underlying fundamental effects are very similar. When a wide spread in value between the highly correlated assets are recognized, the algorithm will either by the lower and or sell the higher until an equilibrium is met similar to the mean reversion strategy.
High-Frequency Trading and Scalping: For our purposes, will look at these as synonymous even though trading desks and hedge funds view them separately. True high-frequency trading attempts to beat out other traders to the thousand of a second and to do so some firms position their computers next door to an exchange to see in one millisecond faster than a competitor if something is rising by a penny.
Unless you’re looking to buy a house next to the New York Stock Exchange to compete with billion-dollar hedge funds, short-term trading or scalping is likely more up your alley. Even this term has evolved over time whereas traders use to look to make profits on the difference in the bid-ask spread but now has taken a wider meeting for very short-term traits.
For more information about algorithmic trading, click here
submitted by iforexrobot to u/iforexrobot [link] [comments]

Psychological Levels

Hey all, I realize this is a bit of a read but I figured hopefully some of you might get something out of it. I've recently started a blog on trading as I love writing and it's one of my passions.
Regardless I'm not huge on self promotion so I'll simply post it here and if you're interested you're welcome to PM me for the link otherwise I'd love to start a conversation on the topic here!
Please share your thoughts on the subject, I definitely don't claim to be an expert, these are just some observations of mine.
=)
The general consensus within the Forex community on the understanding of psychological levels is one that is both very basic, and relatively black and white. I would argue that in my trading I have discovered psychological levels tend to be much more encompassing, slightly more subjective, and incredibly useful in helping traders determine overall market sentiment and trader bias under the direction of accompanying techniques.
Although psychological levels as a trading tool are relatively misunderstood from a technical perspective, the fact remains, when employed properly they can be one of the few truly effective leading indicators under the confirmation of post candle-close analysis. Keep in mind the term "leading indicator" is one I use with caution as I find all too often technical analysts refer to the term in situations where it ought not be.
If you take the concept of a true "leading indicator" at face value - "an indication of potential price movement [continuation, congestion, or reversion], without preconceived reference to prior movement" it's clear that such an indicator can be argued if not impossible, at the very least extremely elusive. This is where an area of interpretation comes in as to what is considered "leading". For most, "leading" constitutes a level or price or volatility in which previous market dynamics have suggested future pattern. Levels of support and resistance, trend continuation, Fibonacci sequence, pivot points, and psychological levels often act as such.
Every one of these methods aside from psychological levels rely entirely on the recognition of former pattern and or the examination of price periods for the purpose of predicting future movement such as pull backs and price extensions. As a result I think it's safe to say you would have to assume there must be a catch. As we all know, there's is clearly no such thing as a holy grail so where does the psychological level fall short?
Psychologicals work entirely on the assumption that fellow traders and institutions will be looking at key levels as areas of interest. This is the primary reason these levels can not be used to predict price movement, they are simply useful as a potential indicator of interest from coexisting market participants. As a result, if you intend to take advantage of this information, it's important to ensure you don't fall into the trap of viewing these levels as points of support and resistance in the same way you would after plotting a range as they simply are not. Unlike the majority of indicators, each occurrence of a psychological level should be seen as an independent event. For those familiar with the equities market I've found the one event that best mirrors this phenomenon is that of small-cap "earnings" - a specific day and time within the financial quarter in which a stock is expected to react according to its results and future projections. Unlike calendar events within the currency markets, these small-cap events are not large enough to cause significant market movement among associated instruments.
I think it's of importance to keep in mind that psychologicals do not necessarily have to refer to specific price points at which heightened market participation is expected. If rich player participation is in fact the key factor in determining what is a psychological indicator, other market occurrences should be of value. Timing, for example, should be of interest. The open and close of particular sessions in relation to volatility expansion and contraction. Fellow participants expect these events and address their positions or positioning for the upcoming session accordingly. Once again the particulars of each event are independent but the expectancy of a change to some degree is nearly guaranteed.
Trading psychological levels can certainly have value if utilized properly, but exactly like all other indicators it's crucial to have a tangible understanding of all elements of the tool long before you throw caution to the wind (not that you ever should). Unlike a moving average or an oscillator where you can examine the pieces that make up the indicator, psychological levels require you to dig a little deeper if you hope to effectively make use of them within your trading plan.
submitted by luxaete to Forex [link] [comments]

ARIMA-GARCH Cryptocurrency Trend Projections

I want to be scientific in my cryptocurrency trades. The main thing is to get the baseline projection (BP) as accurate as you can, and then do sell bids at 20% over BP, and buy bids at 20% under BP, or use some other arbitrary percentage number besides 20%.
Not really understanding the math yet, I could make these observations:
This is where I began my journey:
https://hbr.org/1971/07/how-to-choose-the-right-forecasting-technique
This led to:
https://robotwealth.com/fitting-time-series-models-to-the-forex-market-are-arimagarch-predictions-profitable/
which led to:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoregressive_integrated_moving_average <-- ARIMA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoregressive_conditional_heteroskedasticity <-- GARCH
Unfortunately, I don't yet know Calculus or Statistics to be able to read those.
So, here's my question. Does someone already have an ARIMA-GARCH system I can upload my historical binary price data into and then do ARIMA-GARCH projections from that?
submitted by volomike to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

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Moving Average Scalping Strategy: My best Forex trading ...

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